Sunday, January 22, 2017
An EU cliff edge looms - May has to avoid taking us over it
Posted by David Smith at 09:00 AM
Category: David Smith's other articles

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My regular column is available to subscribers on www.thesundaytimes.co.uk This is an excerpt.

Certainty and uncertainty. The certainty from Theresa May that Britain will be leaving the European Union’s single market is enabling some businesses to prepare now for that eventuality.

For some that is a good thing and for some it will make no difference. But those who need more of their operations to be inside the single market can now plan for that. The car industry is worried. So are others. HSBC and UBS have already told us what they are intending in terms of moving some jobs from London. Others will do so.

Those who think the loss of some investment banking jobs is nothing to worry about, something I hear quite a lot, should remember that the City generates a disproportionate amount of the tax revenue needed to pay for public services.

It still will; on any plausible scenario London will remain comfortably the biggest financial centre in Europe. But such is its lead that it will remain the biggest even if it were to lose a chunk of it activity, and its generation of tax revenues, which seems likely, and which will be bad for Britain.

On top of the certainty of leaving the single market, of which more in a moment, there is the massive uncertainty of what happens after two years. The two-year article 50 period, intended to set the terms of Britain’s departure from the EU, is now intended by the prime minister to also include a “bold and ambitious” trade deal with Europe. That looks not merely ambitious, but unachievable.

In setting a high bar, and an over-ambitious timetable, May has significantly increased the chances of failure. Britain’s combined Brexit and free trade agreement talks with the EU could founder for any number of reasons, including the cost of the divorce settlement, with Brussels talking about a figure of at least €60bn (£52bn).

If not a good deal then, as the prime minister has promised, she will walk away. The “cliff edge” that many thought should be avoided at all costs, and which the government would seek to avoid at all costs, is now part of the official negotiating position. The logic is that the EU would be hit by such an abrupt breaking-off of economic relations, which it would. But Britain would be hit very much harder. That is not bold; it is irresponsible. The prime minister is not only given us a harder Brexit than business feared, but has also inserted a “hardball” element.

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Sunday, January 15, 2017
Inequality is falling - somebody should tell Theresa May
Posted by David Smith at 09:00 AM
Category: David Smith's other articles

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My regular column is available to subscribers on www.thesundaytimes.co.uk This is an excerpt.

Inequality has become the fallback position for politicians in need of a theme, or organisations which want to show they care. Inequality, it seems, is driving political change – pushing voters to extremes - and uncomfortable electoral outcomes.

Inequality threatens the very survival of capitalism, which is why the World Economic Forum, as it gathers in Davos this week, has named it as one of the three key risks facing the world economy over the next 10 years and has as its theme “responsive and responsible leadership”.

Inequality provided the backdrop to Jeremy Corbyn’s populist relaunch and his proposal for a pay cap. Or was it a pay ratio? The maximum wage, last seen in British football in the early 1960s (it was £20 a week, now some earn that a minute), seems to appeal to the Labour leader.

I don’t worry too much about the World Economic Forum, which has to find something to talk about and has a habit of picking the wrong themes. I don’t worry very much about Corbyn either. The idea of a populist relaunch is to make yourself popular, and he is a very long way from that, and from power.

I do, however, worry about somebody who is in power, our prime minster. In her first big speech for a while, Theresa May warmed to a theme which I fear will become a motif for her premiership. Though her speech on the “shared society” focused on mental health, a worthy topic, it was interspersed with other references.

“We need to address the economic inequalities that have emerged in recent years,” she said, so that everybody shares in the country’s prosperity. She criticised “politicians who supported and promoted an economic system that works well for a privileged few, but failed to ensure that the prosperity generated by free markets and free trade is shared by everyone, in every corner and community of their land.”

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Sunday, January 08, 2017
Shock news: forecasters called the economy about right in 2016
Posted by David Smith at 09:00 AM
Category: David Smith's other articles

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My regular column is available to subscribers on www.thesundaytimes.co.uk This is an excerpt. The table to accompany the piece is available in the newspaper.

Of all the experts to be castigated in recent months in this strange climate in which we find ourselves, none have got it in the neck more than economic forecasters.

Those who try to predict the economy’s performance in uncertain and in some respects inherently unpredictable times have been attacked for getting things so badly wrong that we would have been better off consulting Paul the Octopus, who developed a reputation for correctly predicting the results of World Cup games, or popping along to the nearest fair and the fortune teller’s tent.

Even Andy Haldane, the Bank of England’s chief economist, has joined in, saying that forecasters had a “Michael Fish moment” in failing to predict the financial crisis, and an echo of it in overestimating the short-term damage from the Brexit vote. The profession, he said, was in something of a crisis.

It may surprise you, therefore, that had you taken most of the economic forecasts published this time last year, you would have been rewarded with a pretty accurate picture of what has happened to Britain’s economy over the past 12 months. In fact, in the very many years I have compiling my annual forecasting league tables, I cannot remember quite so many forecasts clustered around the outturns for the main economic variables.

At the start of last year forecasters were on average a little more optimistic on growth than turned out to be the case. But they were pretty close on inflation, expected the labour market to continue to improve and saw Britain’s balance of payments problem either persisting or getting worse.

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Sunday, January 01, 2017
Peering through the fog of 2017 uncertainty
Posted by David Smith at 09:00 AM
Category: David Smith's other articles

My regular column is available to subscribers on www.thesundaytimes.co.uk This is an excerpt.

A new year is upon us, and with it the challenge of trying to plot a path through the uncertainty. That there is more uncertainty than usual is not in doubt, as is the fact that there is a range of possible outcomes – good and bad – for both Britain and the global economy.

Forecasting, meanwhile, has become more challenging. Even for those who correctly guessed the outcome of the momentous political events of last year, predicting the market and economic response to them was another story.

I thought, rather than getting bogged down in precise numbers for growth, inflation and other economic magnitudes – don’t worry there will be plenty of those in columns to come shortly – it would be useful to sketch out some broad themes.

The broad themes that will occupy us over the next 12 months, and no doubt there will be more, are Brexit, European politics (and the interaction of the two) Donald Trump’s America and China )and the interaction of those two too).

Let me take them in turn. In the next few months we will move from the phoney war on Brexit to the actual process. Theresa May, who has promised a big speech soon setting out the government’s priorities – it would be unwise to expect too much detail – remains committed to triggering article 50 by the end of March, whatever the Supreme Court decides.

The logic of that timetable, that we will clear the formal two-year Brexit process in time for us not to have European parliament elections in 2019, and well ahead of the 2020 general election, is not that strong. It will be better to have a proper strategy in place than rush it. But, one way or another, it is reasonable to expect article 50 to be triggered in the coming months. That in itself is testimony to how rapidly events have moved. This time last year we did not even know for sure whether there would be a referendum in 2016.

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Sunday, December 25, 2016
A year when all roads led to Brexit
Posted by David Smith at 09:00 AM
Category: David Smith's other articles

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My regular column is available to subscribers on www.thesundaytimes.co.uk This is an excerpt.

Well. I am spoilt for choice. Do I write about Donald Trump and whether his tax-cutting, infrastructure-boosting plans will mean a new dawn for the American economy? Or, as is also possible, that his protectionism and unconventional way of doing political business will hasten a new dusk for the world economy.

It is tempting. For the moment the conventional wisdom – and the view of the markets - is that good Trump will triumph over bad protectionist Trump, though the president-elect still has plenty of issues with China. We will only know for sure, of course, when he has moved beyond tweeting and into the White House. A sustained boost in US growth, which is what has been driving markets, would be very welcome if it happens.

Or, I could focus on the loss of a prime minister and chancellor, both of whom appeared to have established themselves as semi-permanent fixtures. David Cameron and George Osborne have not exactly disappeared from view but the political waters closed over them with remarkable rapidity, leaving them to ply their trade on the speaker circuit, and their successors made competent starts.

One day, perhaps, there will be a yearning for the Cameron-Osborne era. Even in the Tory party, perhaps especially in the Tory party, that day has yet to arrive. It may be some time coming.

How about the Bank of England and monetary policy? Mark Carney rendered himself permanently unpopular with some sections of the political community by warning that the result of the June 23rd referendum would have consequences, and then by acting on those warnings by leading the monetary policy committee (MPC) into cutting interest rates and further stimulus measures in August.

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Sunday, December 18, 2016
Clouds start to gather over Britain's households
Posted by David Smith at 09:00 AM
Category: David Smith's other articles

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My regular column is available to subscribers on www.thesundaytimes.co.uk This is an excerpt.

For many people reading this, and for many whose businesses depend on healthy household finances, two trends will dominate the outlook in 2017. One is the extent of the rise in inflation, now clearly coming through in the figures. The other is how far the slowdown in the job market, also evident in the data, extends.

Inflation, which disappeared entirely last year, is ending this year on a rising trajectory. It was 1.2% last month, or 1.4% on the new CPIH (consumer prices including housing) measure favoured by official statisticians, or 2.2% for nostalgia buffs who still follow the old retail prices index.

Most of its rise, and most of the rise yet to come, is a direct reflection of sterling’s post-referendum fall, although some of it is explained by both the reversal of earlier energy and commodity price falls, and those falls dropping out of the inflation comparison.

Indeed, there are some spectacular increases coming through in costs. Industry’s raw material and fuel costs rose by a hefty 12.9% in the 12 months to November. Not all of that will feed through to final prices but some of it certainly will.

In a year’s time, according to most forecasters, consumer price inflation will be close to 3%, though the Bank of England has suggested that the pound’s recent small recovery may mean a slightly lower inflation profile than it feared last month. But the sweet spot we have been enjoying for a while, in which even modestly rising earnings comfortably outstripped the rise in prices, looks to be coming to an end.

The question for household budgets, which will also be of intense interest to the Bank of England, is whether there is an acceleration in pay in response to rising inflation. In the past, when we used to talk about the wage-price spiral, that would have been regarded as a certainty. Now it is not.

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Sunday, December 11, 2016
We need more globalisation and technology, not less
Posted by David Smith at 09:00 AM
Category: David Smith's other articles

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My regular column is available to subscribers on www.thesundaytimes.co.uk This is an excerpt.

These are risky times, in which the dangers of policymakers getting things badly wrong are greater than for a very long time. The lure of populist policies, which appear to help beleaguered voters but will end up doing them harm, is tangible and dangerous.

A few days ago Mark Carney used a speech in Liverpool to pick up on one of Theresa May’s themes. The prime minister, in her Lord Mayor’s banquet speech last month, had repeated her argument that globalisation has left too many people behind.

The Bank of England governor, while absolving monetary policy of the blame the prime minister tried to heap on it a couple of months ago – and doing so quite successfully – also had worries about globalisation. Many people in the advanced economies, including Britain, lament a loss of control and have lost trust in the system.

And, as he put it: “Measures of aggregate progress bear little relation to their own experience. Rather than a new golden era, globalisation is associated with low wages, insecure employment, stateless corporations and striking inequalities.”

The “left behind” arguments about the consequences of globalisation have been seen as key drivers of this year’s dramatic political developments, including the Brexit vote and the election of Donald Trump. As Carney noted, the fact that a more open and connected world economy has lifted over a billion people out of poverty and resulted in a considerable rise in living standards – world gross domestic product per head is two and a half times what it was in 1960 – cuts little ice if people in Britain are in the first “lost decade” for real wage growth since the 1860s.

Add in technology and the rise of the robots, where Carney quoted his chief economist Andy Haldane’s figure that up to 15m current British jobs are at risk of automation, and progress appears to bring only bad news. Automation and its possible consequences for employment is worth a piece on its own, which I shall save for another day.

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Sunday, December 04, 2016
Britain's households are swimming but not drowning in debt - yet
Posted by David Smith at 09:00 AM
Category: David Smith's other articles

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My regular column is available to subscribers on www.thesundaytimes.co.uk This is an excerpt.

Household debt is back in the headlines. Official figures show that consumer credit is rising by 10.5% a year, its fastest since well before the crisis, while the Bank of England has warned that the debt being accumulated by households is one of the risks it sees to financial stability, among several others.

How worried should we be about this household debt build-up, which is running in parallel to the rise in government debt described here last week?

Let me start with some numbers. Consumer credit, as noted, was up by 10.5% in the 12 months to October, it fastest rate since October 2005. Consumer borrowing, on this measure, hit a total of £190.1bn. Of the latest 12-month rise, there was an increase of 9% in credit card borrowing and 11.4% in other loans and advances.

The sharp-eyed among you will have noticed that while £190bn is a lot of money, it does not represent anything like the total for the amount that individuals owe to lenders. That total is a chunky £1,508bn - £1.5 trillion – overwhelmingly in the form of mortgages. It is also growing, though at more sedate 4% a year.

Do these figures suggest a return to the pre-crisis bad old days of binge borrowing? No, or at least not yet. The annual growth of consumer credit has been in double figures since June, a mere five months. In the 1990s and 2000s, it was consistently above 10%; from 1994 to the autumn of 2005. In that period, consumer credit growth was often in the mid to high teens, peaking at 17.6%. I would be surprised if that were to happen again.

As for the overall growth in lending to households, it has been running at its strongest levels since the crisis for much of this year but- driven by the mortgage boom of the pre-crisis era – grew much faster in the past. Growth in overall lending peaked at more than 15% in 2004. In the 10 years to September 2008, the amount owed by households rose by almost 160% to £1.39 trillion.

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